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Pugneys and Sandal Castle

This is a great walk to start little legs off on hills! It’s a lovely walk round the lake and the walk up to Sandal Castle gives fab views over the surrounding countryside.

Route: http://www.wakefield.gov.uk/Longer%20Walks/Walks_Leaflet_12_Sandal.pdf

Distance: 3-4 miles depending on the path you take.

Accessibility: Whilst the path round the lake is perfect for buggies, the path up to the castle is not!

Parking: Pay and display car park

Facilities: The visitor centre has a cafe and toilets. There are lots of picnic benches and a great playground.

We did this route in an anti-clockwise direction. There is a signposted path away from the lake to take you onto a tree lined path.

You can’t really go too wrong on this walk- you can always see the castle or lake so know which direction you should be going in! Heading up the hill there are great views of the castle and lake.

At the top you’re rewarded with great views.

The walk back is lovely, and you rejoin the lake path.

For a shorter route, the lakeside path is extremely child- friendly, read this blog.

Transpennine Trail, Woodlesford to Leeds City Centre, 10km

This great section of the trail takes you on a path between the canal and River Aire past Thwaite Mills. From here you can take a train back to the start. There is a bridge that has stairs up, so be prepared to carry your pram if you take it!

Route: Start at Woodlesford Lock and follow the marked path towards the city centre.

Parking: Free carpark at Woodlesford Lock.

Facilities: There are no services that you pass on route, so make sure you head to the loo before you leave! Otherwise it’s a fair way until you hit the Royal Armouries.

Accessibility: The path is mostly grit or tarmac but there are muddy stretches in the middle, so maybe avoid after rainy periods! There is one set of steep stairs, so if you do take a pram you might need two people or some big muscles!!

Alternative: You could park atThwaite Mills and join the path there to walk to and back from the city centre. This part of the path is very easy.

Starting the walk at Woodlesford lock gives you plenty to look at with the canal boats. When you get to the next lock (Fishpond Lock) you need to cross to the other side.

You’ll be on this side for a while, the path passes under the M1 and through the woodland that sits between the canal and river.

Next up comes the difficult part of the walk if you have a pram (if not- crack on!).

You need to cross back across the canal via this bridge. The steep steps on the top picture below need climbing. At the other side of the bridge the path is the picture in the bottom left, but on the other side of the road (bottom right picture) there are no steps so an easier option with a pram.

The path passes Thwaites Mills here, before once again crossing the canal and joining the new path of the route.

From here you start to see the residences surrounding the city centre, and you can see the improvements that are being made to the area. Stick to the side of the canal and you can’t go wrong!

The trains from the city centre to Woodlesford usually run every half hour, but check before you go!

Other walks from Woodlesford;

Swinsty (3 miles) & Fewston (4 miles) Reservoirs

These gorgeous reservoirs North of Otley are perfect for pram walks and give fab views. I’d say Fewston is more picturesque, but Swinsty is shorter with better views over the valley… or you could do them both!

Route: Yorkshire water provide routes for both the Swinsty route (3 miles) and for Fewston (4 miles).

Accessibility: Both fine for prams; Swinsty a little easier.

Facilities: Park at the middle car park (Swinsty and Fewston carpark) where there is a toilet block, picnic benches and often an ice cream van.

Both reservoirs are extremely easy to navigate- after all, you’re walking round two massive bodies of water so it should be fairly clear where to go!

Walking round Swinsty is mainly on wider tracks, it can be a little muddy approaching the car park from a clockwise direction. Fewston is on gritted paths.

A 6km walk around RSPB Fairburn Ings, Castleford

This is a perfect walk if you want to feel away from it all without actually getting away from it all! There are lovely views and there are good paths, so great for a pram and a pooch.

Route: I followed the green trail on this map before dropping down and following the blue trail back along the river. It’s about 6km in total.

Facilities: At the visitor centre there are toilets, refreshments and a nature play area (so no slides, more about exploring). Along the walk there are plenty of benches to stop and enjoy a snack or picnic along with the views!

Parking: £4 all day or free for RSPB members.

Accessibility: Grit paths, suitable for a pram. A little uphill at the start but then flat or downhill the rest of the way round.

We’ve previously walked through Fairburn Ings when we did a circular route from Fairburn to Ledsham, but we’d not ventured to the west side before. It was much prettier than I realised, with great views.

I started by walking up the coal tips path- I turned right at the top of the hill to walk round the ponds. These pictures really don’t do the views justice!

Rather than doing the full route I continued along the path south west towards the river, then turning round just before the old bridge to follow the river path back. Truly gorgeous!

If you have little ones, you could try some of the activities closer to the vistor centre, read our previous blog post here.

Walks nearby; RSPB St Aiden’s.

Harewood Estate Circular, 4.8 miles

This lovely walk is around the estate perimeter, with lovely views over the house, through the deer park and across to Almscliffe Crag.

Route: We followed this route from the Walking Englishman website.

Accessibility: Muddy in places but generally fine with a buggy. There is one set of steps in Harewood when you leave the path adjacent to the A61.

Parking: there’s free parking at the junction of Wike Lane and A61 (where the walk starts)

Facilities: None, and limited places to picnic other than the field you start in and the deer park. The route passes the Muddy Boots cafe which has a children’s menu, high chairs and changing facilities.

This is a relatively easy route, with a couple of hills but nothing too strenuous. It’s just enough to let you feel that you’ve done a decent walk! Great if you don’t want to travel too far out of Leeds.

Bramley Fall, 1 mile

This might only be a short walk, but it’s got lots to explore along the way!

Route: Found on the following website: http://west-leeds-country-park-and-green-gateways.webplus.net/doorstep_walk2_bramley_fall.html. The paths are signposted at key points.

Accessibility: Along the canal path is fine, and you can get down and back up other ways, but this route itself would be difficult with a buggy.

Parking: Car park on Leeds & Bradford Road

Facilities: There’s a basic playground and picnic area. It’s a short drive to Kirkstall Morrison’s with a cafe and toilets, but there are none in the park itself.

This lovely route takes you down through pretty woodland (quite steep and uneven surface) onto the canal, crossing over a lock that we were lucky enough to see in use.

It’s a flat and easy walk along the canal- with the added bonus of a train line to the other side.

Crossing back over another stepped lock takes you back through the woodland. Before the playground you also pass outdoor equipment from a ‘Trim Trail’ that adds a little fun.

Northwood Fairy Trail, York

There’s a little magic in these woods, if you listen closely and stay very still you might just find a fairy!

Website:https://www.northwoodtrail.co.uk

Northwood Trail is a 1.5km path through some gorgeous woodland. You get the distinct feeling that you’re not alone, and can find lots of evidence that fairies are around, from the toadstool fairy rings, to the overhead fairy bridges, to the fairy doors on the trees. You’ll even see the thrones of the fairy king and queen!

Jess was disappointed not to see a fairy (she’d hoped dressing like a fairy might encourage them to show themselves), but reliably informed us that they were sleeping, and was happy that she’d seen where they live!

The path passes a bamboo maze to find a fairy ring! Be warned, it’s not an easy one and you may be in there longer than you think!

Towards the end of the trail is an area for children to play, with plenty of chopped logs to climb over and a den building area.

Back at the start we enjoyed tea and cake at the GORGEOUS cafe (I imagine in winter it’s even more awesome) and visited the fairy museum.

We really enjoyed this truly lovely walk (even in the rain) but be warned there’s limited places for stopping on the trails, and nowhere to picnic. As such it’s not a walk that you can spend a long time on, so take that into consideration when deciding whether to pay up! It could definitely do with some activities on the way round, perhaps some puzzles or nature spots and rubbings. Having said that it’s still relatively new, so perhaps these things are on the way!

So it’s not an all-day attraction, but would be a great stopping point to the coast or moors. The cafe itself is worth a stop, and I think we would on our next trip to Bridlington.

PS When looking back at our photos Jess was delighted to spot fairies!! They were invisible to our eyes, but the camera never lies, and we can see lots of fairy orbs flying around the fairy ring… see, they really do exist!!

👉Another Fairy Trail that you might enjoy is Studfold! This is more of an activity based trail, so you can make more of a day of it!

Sundown Adventureland, Retford

We had THE BEST day at this amazing theme park for the under 10s! We’d been last year, and had a great day but left feeling the park was a little tired in places and needed some tlc. Since then there’s been some!

The park consists of a number of areas with themed rides and play areas. There are also small towns, with lots to explore and buttons to press! With a couple of indoor soft play areas there is lots to do in all weather 👍👍

At three, Jess was able to go on all but one of the attractions, and I was able to take James (7 weeks) on most things too.

The rides were definitely the highlight for Jess, her favourite was the water ride which was a pirate themed raft ride which squirted you as you went past! She liked driving the tractors on that ride; great that with four seats our whole little family could get on.

My personal favourites were the flying pigs and ostrich ride!

The play areas are fab; we loved the fort with all the slides and Captain Sandy’s Play Cove which is based on a huge sandpit.

There are picnic areas all over, but there are plenty of food places too (if a little pricey). There’s a great ice cream shop!

If you have small children I honestly can’t recommend this place enough! We spent the full day here and still didn’t cover everything. I think the ticket prices are great value compared to other days out, particularly if you pay in advance!

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A long weekend in Anglesey

A couple of weeks ago we visited the beautiful Welsh Island of Anglesey for a long weekend. I think it was a little smaller than I had realised, so you can travel around easily and we got more done than I anticipated. The weather was superb, which obviously helped with our enjoyment! The only negative? Jess couldn’t understand why we didn’t see any whales haha. Here are our highlights!

1. Newborough Forest (with stunning beach)

We visited here a few times because it was SO gorgeous! There are lots of amazing forest trails for walks and bikes, including an activity trail for small children. The sandy beach is beautiful and we spent a full day collecting shells and making sandcastles.

2. Beaumaris Castle

One of the best castles I’ve ever visited! It’s a fantastic location, very picturesque. There’s lots to explore, although my heart did skip a little seeing Jess so high up. There is a little activity trail for children and an app to download and play (although we couldn’t seem to find anything).

Beaumaris itself is a lovely town too to explore, and if crabbing is your thing, there’s lots going on off the pier.

3. Plas Newydd House & Gardens

The House is huge and great to look around; there are fab views over Snowdonia and inside Whistler’s mural is a highlight (although Jess didn’t stay entertained too long).

Outside gives you the opportunity to spot red squirrels… Jess saw one first (well she thought it was a fox but I’ll still let her have it). As expected of National Trust properties, there is a large woodland adventure playground.

4. Red Dwarf Bay

We visited two places I’d recommend here; The Ship with a beer garden right on the shoreline (pictured), and the Tavern, which has beautiful views over the bay.

Overall, a gorgeous weekend- severely lacking in photos as we spent so much time on the beach!

Rabbit Ings Country Park, Barnsley

This lovely little park has a number of short walks that would suit little legs and has masses of wildflowers to enjoy. There are a number of routes that can be followed by coloured markers, including a path up to a viewpoint.

Website and map: https://thelandtrust.org.uk/space/rabbit-ings-country-park/?doing_wp_cron=1563200285.8920269012451171875000

Parking: Free parking

Facilities: There were toilets at the visitor centre open when I visited, but they may not be open all the time. Benches around the park.

Accessibility: Good paths, steep in places. Fine for buggies and little bikes!

Whilst there are marked routes you can follow, I chose my own path, taking in most of the perimeter and viewpoint was about 4km. It was a beautiful morning, but the paths were quite quiet and I enjoyed the peace!

The walk up to the viewpoint was pretty, and there’s a well positioned bench to enjoy the view.

It’s a lovely park, and if you’re in the area a good place to spend a couple of hours!