Eccup Reservoir, North Leeds (4.5 miles)

If you’re living in North Leeds, you’ve no doubt tried this walk before… it’s perfect if you want to feel that you’ve escaped from the bustle but don’t want to travel too far. It’s not pushchair friendly and might be a tad long for little legs, but is good for older children and is fairly flat.

Route: A good description on this site.

Distance: 4.5 miles

Accessibility: Not suitable for pushchairs. Fairly flat, but can get muddy and a few stiles.

Facilities: None. The Dexter is a decent pub a short drive away if you’re looking for food and drinks afterwards.

Parking: Park on Lakeland Drive or Alwoodley Lane.

I recently walked this with the baby walking group, and enjoyed some gorgeous Autumn sunshine.

After walking down Lakeland Drive, take the path on the left to walk round the reservoir in a clockwise direction. Whilst this walk doesn’t provide access to the waterfront itself, you are provided with lovely views through the trees during the first part of the walk.

The route should be fairly clear through the fields on this well walked route, watch out for lots of mud after wet weather!

After leaving the fields, there’s a fairly chunky walk along the road. Luckily it’s pretty quiet, but bare this in mind if you’re taking children with you.

The final part of the walk is along a path between the woodland surrounding the reservoir and the golf course. It is deceptively long, but this time of year it’s great to enjoy all these colours.

Be warned the climb back up Goodrick Lane to the cars feels a lot steeper than it actually is, especially if your legs are tired!

Overall, a lovely walk to enjoy if you need to stay close to Leeds or don’t want to venture too far away.

10 ways to entertain kids on walks

We’re doing our best to get Jess used to walking. When she was little she joined us in a carrier, first on the front then on the back. And now she’s getting really good at walking longer distances, but at the end of the day she’s only three, and so whilst we might be entertained by the scenery alone, she needs a little more to keep her going. Here are 10 things that we do on our walks to keep her entertained.

1. Pack a picnic

Jess LOVES eating outdoors, so stopping for a ‘snic-snic’ is a key part of our walk. She helps us choose where to eat and before she goes she helps make up the bag. Even on short walks we stop for a snack… she loves finding places with a pretty view for us. Make sure to pop a waterproof rug in your bag in case there’s no benches.

2. Spotting and word games

The easiest game is good-old I-Spy. Jess isn’t great at letters yet, so we do colours with her. I’ve seen loads of games and spotting sheets for when she gets a little older, such as spotting different tree types, birds, insects. In a field of sheep, how many can you see? How many trees on a path? Get creative.

I still remember I-Spy books from my childhood, there are loads to choose from and they’re pretty cheap! This one, for the countryside could be a great one for walks.

πŸ‘‰i-SPY In the countryside: What can you spot? (Collins Michelin i-SPY Guides)

If they’re a little older word games could work well, you could play ‘Who am I?’, related word games, games beginning with a letter of the alphabet (can you find something that you can see on your walk for each letter of the alphabet), or memory games (I went on a walk to XXX and I took with me…….). The possibilities are endless!

3. Games-on-the-Go

When Jess inevitably starts saying that she’s tired, we keep her going with races to fixed points ahead. These don’t just have to be running races, they can be skipping, jumping and hopping.

Follow the Leader is super easy, just create actions for little legs to copy (singing I’m following the leader if you feel like it).

Playing hide and seek is another winner, with her running ahead to hide behind a big tree or rock.

And then there’s the good old reliable peg game, try and peg it on each other without the, noticing (or in our case pretending not to notice πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚).

4. Finding nature’s treasures

Sometimes when I’m super-organised I make a little scavenger hunt sheet up in advance with little pictures of what Jess has to find or see. It works well on walks that you’ve been on before so you know what might be likely. If you’re feeling time-rich you could even create bingo cards for all the family that you can re-use.

You can also buy a treasure hunt game like this one, which can fit in a pocket and can provide hours of entertainment!

πŸ‘‰gofindit – outdoor nature treasure hunt card game for families

If I want to keep it simple, I pass her a little bag and she has to collect treasures. She’s only allowed ten, so has to decide which ones she wants to keep. Woodland walks are great for this, often she’ll just collect pine cones and choose which ones she likes, the last one she found a baby pine cone, a Mummy one, a grandad one… you get the picture!

You could also set a challenge of collecting different types of things, perhaps different colours, or make it more educational and collect different types of seeds. Collecting sticks is also a favourite game, which she can then use as drumsticks on various things that we pass!

If you’re feeling creative, you could use the things you find to create some wild art too.

If you’re short of time, wait until you get home for some nature creations, your outing could keep them entertained all day!

5. Singing

Jess is at the age where she loves to sing, particularly nursery rhymes, which works for me as that’s about the limit of my singing ability. From my days working in summer camps I feel I’ve got a good selection of songs for when she’s older too (no doubt the type you might sing at Guide/Scout camps), but there’s also the option to play favourite songs from your phone. Anyone who’s been to a kids disco in Europe over the past few years might remember the classic ‘chu chu wa’ which also keeps her going!

6. Jumps and balancing

A one for the little ones really! Balancing on logs and roots and doing jumps off rocks and stones is always fun. She loves jumping over anything; small puddles, twigs, lines on paved paths!

Wet weather is perfect for puddle jumping, and as long as Jess is wrapped up warm we’re happy for her to splash away. Her puddle suit from Mountain Warehouse is fleece lined so keeps her nice and cosy in Autumn (link below if you fancy something similar).

πŸ‘‰Mountain Warehouse Spright Printed Rain Suit – Breathable Autumn Suit, Waterproof Coat, Quick Dry, Taped Seams Kids Raincoat, Fleece Lined, High Viz – for Travelling Pink 18-24 Months

7. What’s that shape?

Shapes and pictures can be seen everywhere you look! Look at the clouds, puddles, bark on the trees, patches of mud, piles of leaves!

8. Stone throwing

Stones, acorns, pine cones or conkers, we see who can throw them the furthest (obviously in a safe space!!). Sometimes we go a bit crazy (ahem) and do kicking instead! If you’re headed on a path with a stream or river you could play Pooh sticks, or find things that you think could float (which lasts the longest?).

9. Storytelling

Adventures are EVERYWHERE when you go on a walk, and you can let your imagination run wild. In the woods can we see the three bears? What about the fairies? If we can’t why not? What are they doing, where must they be? Near a river we hunt for crocodiles, over a bridge Jess checks that there are no trolls underneath. Have some trees been pushed over? Maybe it’s bears in the woods… we’d better try and hide!

Some family walks have trails and activities as you walk, so we make the most of them and add stuff as we go along.

10. Tree hugging

Jess randomly started doing this herself one day at Golden Acre Park, we try to find trees that she can reach round herself, and then bigger ones we try it if we hold hands.

Other ideas

So there are our top 10 things, but there are loads of other things you could try, how about taking paper and crayons for interesting rubbings? Or if they’re a little older stopping to draw a picture of something interesting they can see?

Weather can also help with entertainment, rain provides puddle jumping, sun provides shadow tag, and if you’re lucky, snow creates snowballs!!

What else do you do on walks to keep little ones entertained?

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Harewood Estate Circular, 4.8 miles

This lovely walk is around the estate perimeter, with lovely views over the house, through the deer park and across to Almscliffe Crag.

Route: We followed this route from the Walking Englishman website.

Accessibility: Muddy in places but generally fine with a buggy. There is one set of steps in Harewood when you leave the path adjacent to the A61.

Parking: there’s free parking at the junction of Wike Lane and A61 (where the walk starts)

Facilities: None, and limited places to picnic other than the field you start in and the deer park. The route passes the Muddy Boots cafe which has a children’s menu, high chairs and changing facilities.

This is a relatively easy route, with a couple of hills but nothing too strenuous. It’s just enough to let you feel that you’ve done a decent walk! Great if you don’t want to travel too far out of Leeds.

Bramley Fall, 1 mile

This might only be a short walk, but it’s got lots to explore along the way!

Route: Found on the following website: http://west-leeds-country-park-and-green-gateways.webplus.net/doorstep_walk2_bramley_fall.html. The paths are signposted at key points.

Accessibility: Along the canal path is fine, and you can get down and back up other ways, but this route itself would be difficult with a buggy.

Parking: Car park on Leeds & Bradford Road

Facilities: There’s a basic playground and picnic area. It’s a short drive to Kirkstall Morrison’s with a cafe and toilets, but there are none in the park itself.

This lovely route takes you down through pretty woodland (quite steep and uneven surface) onto the canal, crossing over a lock that we were lucky enough to see in use.

It’s a flat and easy walk along the canal- with the added bonus of a train line to the other side.

Crossing back over another stepped lock takes you back through the woodland. Before the playground you also pass outdoor equipment from a ‘Trim Trail’ that adds a little fun.

The Gnome Roam, Newmillerdam, Wakefield

This has fast made it to one of my favourite ever family walks. We’ve walked round Newmillerdam a few times and on this sunny day the car park was full and lots of people were out enjoying the circuit round the lake. But once off the lakeside we only passed a couple of people and were able to soak in the fantastic woodland walk in peace.

Location: https://www.wakefield.gov.uk/sport-and-leisure/parks-and-countryside/gnome-roam

Route: https://www.wakefield.gov.uk/Documents/sports-leisure/parks-countryside/gnome-roam-leaflet.pdf It starts in the car park and is well signposted all in way round in both directions.

Parking: Coin only pay and display

Facilities: Toilets at far side of lake. There’s a couple of pubs and cafes too, we went to Lakeside for a gorgeous Antipasti Platter.

Distance: 1.8 miles

Accessibility: Most of the route is surfaced and fairly flat, but it’s steep in places. There’s also a short grassy section. At the start avoid the steps by taking the track to the left and then cutting up to the right. I’d recommend either ditching the buggy OR taking the reverse route- there’s still a steep part but it’s much clearer and more manageable.

This is a lovely family walk, where you find the gnomes and complete the various activities as you go round. My favourite activity had magnifying glasses to look at some bugs, genius!

Whilst we’ve walked round the lake before we’ve never ventured up into the country park, and so I’m so pleased this takes you up there it’s gorgeous ❀️ The bear is in a particularly impressive area of woodland!

The route is well signposted throughout, so easy to do without a copy the downloadable route!

It was a superb walk, and we finished it by popping across to the other side of the lake to the Lakeside cafe where I had a fab antipasti platter!

Please give this gorgeous walk a go, I cannot wait to go back with Jess do it with her, let me know how you get on!

There was plenty on this walk to keep Jess entertained, but if you need more (!!) try this post for ideas.

Damflask Reservoir walk with a great cafe stop! (3.5 miles)

This is another lovely walk courtesy of Yorkshire Water; it’s buggy friendly, and with the option to stop at the fab licensed cafe in Low Bradfield, it’s a great choice for families.

Route: Download the route here; https://www.yorkshirewater.com/things-to-do/walks/damflask

Facilities: In Low Bradfield a local family friendly cafe open Wednesday to Sunday has great food, a small play area and good toilets πŸ‘ Plenty of benches around the route.

Accessibility: Pretty flat with decent paths (small sections on the road), suitable for buggies

Parking: Lots of roadside free parking. We parked on the damn.

The route is really clear and there is no need for a map- just follow the side of the reservoir. We went in a clockwise direction starting at the damn. There are loads of spots to stop for a picnic by the waterside, or benches on the path.

The advantage of starting at the damn means that the half way point is Low Bradfield, a short detour from the path takes you into this pretty village, where we found an ice cream van as well as The School Rooms, a massive find!! We’d had a picnic, but stopped in for drinks when Jess caught sight of the bouncy castle! The food looked awesome, next time we’re definitely stopping for lunch!

I love that this reservoir has boats! The walk back passes the boathouse giving Jess another point of interest. After the walks there are lots of pubs nearby for further refreshments and toilets (I sound bloody obsessed with toilets but given 4 weeks ago I gave birth that’s allowed).

Overall, it’s a fab little walk, I was so impressed that Jess managed most of it and was cheery throughout (although the ice cream van helped her spirits). A massive thumbs up!

Stanley Ferry & Southern Washlands Nature Reserve, Wakefield (4.6 km)

Wakefield Council have some AMAZING resources for walking, and this route is based on one of their suggested Health Walks. It’s a lovely flat route, with lots to see and some well positioned benches for picnics. Although James was in the carrier today (his first time!) it would be fine for most buggies, although it was a little muddy in places.

Route: http://www.wakefield.gov.uk/Longer%20Walks/Walks_Leaflet_09_Stanley.pdf

Facilities: None, other than benches dotted about for picnics. BUT the Stanley Ferry pub (where you can start/finish) is well set up for families.

Accessibility: Paths are pretty decent and flat so would be fine for most buggies or little bikes!

The walk starts along the canal, where there are lots of boats to look at. Walking through the nature reserve is mostly woodland and extremely peaceful; I didn’t pass a single person on the path! The sound of water brings instant relaxation (much needed in my case as all morning I’d had the sound of nothing but screaming).

My favourite part of the walk was the path between the Lake and the River Calder, it was really beautiful.

It finished back at the canal, with a path from Broadreach Lock, following the Transpennine Trail back to the start.

So in all a hugely enjoyable walk, especially in the sunshine… I’ll be back!

If you’re looking for other walks in the area, this route around Heath Common is a great choice.

A walk from Heath Common, Wakefield (2.5 miles)

We first discovered Heath a couple of years ago, when searching for a ‘cosy pub’. We found the delightful King’s Arms, and have returned on numerous occasions; both to enjoy the pub itself, but also as a starting point for walks around the Southern Washlands Nature Reserve. Today we tried a new route, from a document provided by. Wakefield Council.

Heath

Route: We completed the short walk on this page provided by Wakefield Council, 2.5 miles starting in Heath. Parking is free.

Accessibility: Not suitable for buggies;

muddy in places/ paths through fields

Facilities: The King’s Arms has good food (with children’s menu) and a lovely beer garden.

I think (I know) that I’ve fallen in love with the gorgeous Heath, and on a sunny day like today it really shows off the village to its best.

After looking at some of the many ponies that are kept on Heath Common, the walk starts down a little path from the back of the village covered by trees; truly picture perfect.

The path then opens out onto some lovely fields. You could be anywhere, you really can’t believe how close this is to the centre of Wakefield, it’s such a pretty area! We didn’t pass anyone at all on this part of the route, making it incredibly peaceful.

On the Bridleway between the road and Kirkthorpe we passed a field of bullocks and goats who seemed pretty interested in us (maybe it was the mooing noises Jess was making). She kept herself entertained blowing dandelion clocks and playing with sticky grass.

After passing through Kirkthorpe we joined back onto the path that forms part of the longer route past the Half Moon Lake. Once the Lake came into view, we spotted some steps down towards it, and came across a little bench where we set up for a picnic stop.

Before long we were back in Heath. The access land on which Heath sits is perfect for running around and burning off any remaining energy!

Obviously we finished the walk with a drink at the King’s Arms. The beer garden is lovely. Jess loved watching some horse riders stop for refreshments, their riders enjoying a glass of wine in the saddle!

This was a lovely short walk, nice and flat and easy to navigate; perfect for the 38 week pregnant walker! We’re looking forward to returning and trying the longer route.

Rachel xxx

Barlow Common Nature Trail, Selby

A true hidden beauty spot! As we were visiting the area, today we decided to try the nature trail (4km) at Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s beautiful Barlow Common. With Drax Power Station as a backdrop we weren’t expecting much, but were so impressed by its peacefulness and underrated allure.

Location and Website: https://www.ywt.org.uk/nature-reserves/barlow-common-nature-reserve

Accessibility: Unsurfaced paths, but no stiles, so should be fine for a robust buggy.

Parking: Free parking

Facilities: Toilets and picnic area

Trail: http://data.wildlifetrusts.org/sites/default/files/Wildlife%20Trail%20Barlow%20Common_0.pdf There are 25 wildlife posts to find (the 25th isn’t listed here but is a Silver Birch).

We used the trail map to walk our three year old around this pretty nature reserve, giving her a sheet of paper with 25 circles drawn on. At each post she had to colour in a circle and describe to us the wildlife shown on the post (not much more than bird, leaf etc at her age but everyone needs to start somewhere!) It kept her engaged, particularly in the middle part of the main reserve trail where the posts were closer together. With an older child we may have asked them to draw what they saw.

The walk was delightfully peaceful- unless you count the sound of the birds! There were very few people around so we felt that we had the place to ourselves. The posts helped retain interest in a lovely route- they were often positioned in truly picturesque spots with picnic benches dotted about. The rabbit post was well positioned- the were loads around (not that Jess was quick enough to spot them!).

The route took us past a number of carved benches (also marked on the trail map), which featured some lovely quotes. Perfectly placed to sit and reflect!

The picnic area included a ring of small wooden mushroom stools (that were also dotted about the rest of the route). There were dens in the trees around the picnic area and in the woodland trail that Jess enjoyed playing in.

Overall if you’re looking for somewhere to visit in the Selby area, this is something I’d fully recommend. It’s a lovely spot where you can find real tranquility, even with children!

Not far away in the grounds of Drax Power Station is another reserve that I think we’ll try soon, map of walks here; https://www.drax.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Skylark-Centre-map-walks.png

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Ardsley Reservoir, 2.5km

This is lovely little reservoir, and although I probably wouldn’t go out my way to visit here for such a short route, it’s a good one if you’re in the area or want a breath of fresh air after a White Rose trip!

Location: A small (free car park) is located on Haigh Moor Road, Tingley, WF3 1 EE

Route: From the car park turn left towards the reservoir and then choose the direction round you want to walk! It’s a super easy path.

Accessibility: Flat and surfaced paths are perfect for buggies.

Facilities: None

With just over 3 weeks until my due date, hubby’s banned me from walking too far on my own. Maybe he knows something I don’t, because baby doesn’t feel like it’s coming out anytime soon!

So I decided to visit this small reservoir which had cropped up a few times on social media from people I follow. It was a lovely short walk, with good views, so a good one if you’re nearby and want to squeeze in a walk. It seemed a popular walk, I passed quite a few dog walkers and mums with buggies!

The West Ardsley website suggests there are reservoir rocks around that will help keep little ones entertained. To be fair I didn’t spot any- although I wasn’t really looking and there’s nothing to say new ones aren’t brought.

There are pebble beaches around the perimeter of the reservoir, but bathing is prohibited. That doesn’t stop good opportunities for stone skimming!

There are lovely views on the South side of the reservoir to appreciate too 😍

It took me just over half an hour to walk round this route, and I got an extra boost of smugness when I returned to the car about 30 seconds before it started raining. Love it πŸ‘

There’s not a lot more to say, so I’ll leave you with a few pics of the moody weather!